How the Maine Science Festival has pivoted to get through the pandemic

BANGOR, Maine — Around this time in a normal world, the people who run the Maine Science Festival would be getting ready for their signature event of the year in March…but, well, you can probably complete the sentence yourself. Pandemic. No gatherings. No festival. Sigh.

It’s a real loss because, with its talks, workshops, art activities, and more, the festival generates palpable energy. There’s nothing else like it in Maine.

“It feels almost like you’re going to a concert,” says Kate Dickerson, the festival’s executive director. “People are so happy to be there. And then the added bonus is they’re learning stuff—not necessarily science, which is great if they do—but they’re learning about what we have here in Maine.” Read more

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