Data show that Maine lags the nation as a whole in developing a workforce for science-based and engineering jobs.

But there’s no reason Maine can’t catch up in the science, technology, mathematics and technology — or STEM — fields, said Heather Johnson, commissioner of the Maine Department of Economic and Community Development.

And over the last five years, she added, the life sciences industry has had stronger job growth in Maine than anywhere else in the U.S., which reinforces the state’s potential to be a strong STEM player.

Johnson spoke during a recent virtual event focused on STEM workforce development in Maine and hosted by the Maine State Chamber of Commerce’s education foundation and a nonprofit, Science is US.

Science is US brings together leaders in science, engineering, industry, higher education and labor to galvanize a broad, bipartisan political base of support for science and technology. Read more