Scientists Test Out New Method for Identifying Small Microplastics

Microplastics, from the beads that were once commonplace in cosmetics to the weathered and broken-down remnants of trash, are now ubiquitous in marine and inland waters around the world. To date, though, scientists have struggled to identify which plastics persist longest in the environment and measure their abundance, especially at the smaller end of the size range where they’re most likely to be consumed by foundational species near the bottom of the food web, like zooplankton. Read more

Related Posts

UNE undergraduate receives BioME grant to study rare lobster larvae

A University of New England undergraduate student has received a $5,000 grant from the Bioscience Association of Maine (BioME) to fund...

23 May 2024

New initiative unites Maine’s innovators to bolster STEM research and workforce

An $8 million grant from the National Science Foundation will fund a four-year initiative led by the University of Maine to bolster STEM...

15 May 2024

Jackson Lab hires its first-ever chief scientific officer

Jackson Laboratory, based in Bar Harbor, has hired Mary Dickinson, a globally recognized geneticist, developmental biologist, and bioengineer, as executive vice...

13 May 2024